Hannah and her sisters plan to shave their ‘barnet’ to fundraise for Down Syndrome Association and to help the The Little Princess Trust 

On the 6th July 2014, my life changed forever as it was the day my daughter Rosie was born. At the time, I didn’t know how her smile would light up my world and that she would give me daily life-affirming belly laughs, unconditional love and a best friend for life. Over the years, she has become my ‘wing girl’ who has opened doors I never knew existed and brought friends into my life I never knew I needed. She’s taught me what’s important in life, and for that she has been the greatest gift of all!

 

Rosie is just like any other three-year-old – full of energy, sparkle, attitude and mischief. She spreads light and love wherever she goes, bringing out the very best in people. The only difference being Rosie also has Down’s Syndrome. Those born with Down’s Syndrome have an extra copy of a chromosome – chromosome 21 to be exact (I knew there was something extra special about her). Children with Down’s syndrome share common physical characteristics, although they don’t all look the same and they have different personalities and abilities. Children will also have some degree of learning disability, but this will vary between each individual. As a result, they develop differently than other children, and it may take them a little longer to meet certain milestones.

 

The same as my four other children, I have high hopes for Rosie’s future. Like them, I want Rosie to live a happy, fulfilled and independent life so she can realise her dreams and ambitions.  The road ahead has had more bends and bumps to navigate, but with the help and support of The Down’s Syndrome Association I cannot see any reason why she can’t reach her full potential. The Down’s Syndrome Association is there to help Rosie and others with Down’s Syndrome to live full and rewarding lives.  Every year on 21st March, we celebrate World Down’s Syndrome Day (WDSD). This date was chosen specifically for WDSD as the 21st day of the 3rd month signifies the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down’s Syndrome. People all over the world celebrate the differences by encouraging others to wear odd socks as a way of fundraising to support the worthwhile work the charity does as well as raising awareness about Down’s Syndrome.

It is a day of celebration for myself and our family, as it’s a day of being grateful for Rosie and all that she has brought into our lives. I feel so lucky to have a happy and healthy daughter, as I understand that there are many families who are not so fortunate. To say Thank you for the gift of Rosie, I would like to give something back. My days of endurance challenges are long gone, but I do have a lot of hair! So this WDSD, I plan on donating my hair to The Little Princess Trust who make real hair wigs for children and young people affected by cancer and other illnesses, which makes their journey that little bit easier. Therefore, I’m asking people to sponsor me and I will be donating any money raised to the Down’s Syndrome Association. I must say the response so far has been incredible and in less than a week, we have reached over £4000! In a moment of madness,  I have pledged to further shave my hair completely off if we manage to reach £10,000 and two of my sisters have agreed to do the same, meaning the The Little Princess Trust will get even more hair to make into wigs.


If you would like to help young people affected by cancer as well as supporting Down’s
Syndrome Association
to continue to support people like Rosie, please consider donating via this Justgiving page  https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/wdsdhaircut  and you can also Text donate using RBOO50 £10 to 70070.

Written by Hannah Barnett and Photo Credit Emma Barnett

Rosie Barnett
Rosie Barnett

Hello I'm Tracey

Hannah and her sisters plan to…

0